About Susan Smith Blakely—Author, Speaker, & Law Career Counselor

Susan Smith Blakely: In Her Own Words


Susan Smith BlakelyWhen you tell people you’ve written a book, they usually want to know what motivated you. When you’ve retired from a successful career, they are often curious about why you would put in all that effort instead of just relaxing on a beach somewhere. If you and I had a few minutes to talk, I might answer…

Of course I was motivated by my own experiences practicing law and watching so many talented young women lawyers leave the profession, but it was much more than that.

I am devoted to the concept of women helping women. I have been involved in women’s issues for most of my life, and I am thrilled that my books Best Friends at the Bar: What Women Need to Know about a Career in the Law and Best Friends at the Bar:  The New Balance for Today’s Woman Lawyer offer career advice that has the potential to make a difference in women’s lives. I could not have written these books while I was busy practicing law, but now I am fortunate to be in a position to bring together the collective wisdom of more than 60 women who struggled and triumphed during their legal careers—many of whom I count as my best friends at the bar.

Writing about what women need to know for successful and satisfying careers in the law is a natural extension of my passions for writing and mentoring. I have spent countless rewarding hours offering career advice and mentoring young women lawyers over the years, and I am still troubled by the high percentage of women who abandon legal careers out of frustration with the system and the challenges of work-life balance. Something must be done to change those dynamics—and it all starts with mentoring and passing along the knowledge that will enable these women to make better decisions and create the work-life balance they deserve.

Young women need to be aware of the great benefits and the significant challenges facing women in the law. By helping young women lawyers make informed choices as they plan their careers and making them understand the responsibility that they have to each other while striving to reach their goals, we empower them to take charge of their professional and personal lives.

In the long run, encouraging women lawyers to embrace cooperative approaches in their careers will improve practice conditions and retention rates and, in turn, will provide opportunities for more women to advance to the top levels of law firm management. Women at the top will bring different experience-based perspectives and will have the potential to positively influence workplace environments and the quest for work-life balance that affects both women and men.

Writing a book is always a huge undertaking, but my books are both a labor of love and a celebration of women in the law. I grew up with the law and it always has been a part of my life—starting with my father’s law practice in a small Midwestern town—where there was little chance of the judge’s decision or a jury verdict taking years or of it going unnoticed. Cases, parties, facts, assumptions, and distortions all became part of the fabric of life. I saw the good, the bad, and the ugly up close and personal, and it fascinated me.

From those early experiences, I learned to admire the players who tried to bring about positive change and improve the human condition. They still have my greatest respect and admiration, and, in my own small way, I hope to carry on their legacy by reaching out to the young women who follow me in the law.

Susan Smith Blakely Bio

Ms. Blakely graduated from the University of Wisconsin with distinction and from Georgetown Law where she was a teaching fellow. Her diverse background includes private practice with law firms, specializing in litigation and land use law, experience in both state and federal courts and before administrative commissions and boards, and service in the public sector as Chief of Staff for an elected official. Ms. Blakely also has published comprehensive articles in academic law journals:

Credit Opportunities for Women: The ECOA and Its Effects, Wisconsin Law Review, Fall 1981.

 

 

Judicial and Legislative Attitudes Toward the Right to an Equal Education for the

Handicapped, Ohio State Law Journal, Fall 1979.

 

After 25 years of practice and public service, Ms. Blakely retired as a law firm partner in 2006. She and her husband Bill, who is also a lawyer, live in Great Falls, Virginia, and have two children: Elizabeth, a graduate of the University of Virginia and Seton Hall University School of Law; and Derick, also a graduate of the University of Virginia, who is a first year law student at the University of Baltimore Law School. When she is not writing, Susan enjoys reading, playing the piano, gardening, skiing, traveling, and being with family and friends.

Best Friends at the Bar: What Women Need to Know about a Career in the Law is Ms. Blakely’s first book. Her second book, Best Friends at the Bar:  The New Balance for Today’s Woman Lawyer was released by Wolters Kluwer Law & Business in July 2012.  She has additional books planned for the Best Friends at the Bar series.

Best Friends at the Bar:  What Women Need to Know about a Career in the Law, published in November 2009 by Aspen Publishers, an imprint of Wolters Kluwer Law & Business.

Best Friends at the Bar:  The New Balance for Today’s Woman Lawyer, published in July 2012 by Wolters Kluwer Law & Business.